A bill on the international trade of endangered species that has been drafted since 2001 has been forwarded to the Nepalese government for approval. Nepal is a signatory to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, an international agreement between governments. It aims to ensure international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants without threatening their survival. CITES’ directives are not legally binding, so national legislation has to be amended to adopt these directives and make sure they are implemented on national level.

CITES protects around 5,000 species of animals and 28,000 species of plants from over-exploitation through international trade. More than 100 species on that list can be found in Nepal. So far trad control of those endangered species was not ensured due to absence of according laws. According to Krishna Prasad Acharya (Director General, Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation) this bill is now going to change that and will  “ease the officials in taking decisions on issues of flora and fauna”.

In the absence of the bill, the red sandalwood seized from various parts of the country and traded from India to China are dumped in the country.

“There is no specific provision on species like red sandalwood listed in CITES and the existing law does not have any solution to such problems that crop up during international trading,” added Acharya.

Source: Himalayan Times

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