Bhutan is a country very new to tourism: it was only opened for tourism in 1974 for a couple of thousand lucky travellers. Over the years tourist numbers increased, but are still strictly limited by the government, who adopted a policy of “high value – low volume” tourism right from the start. A daily fee has to be paid for each person visiting the country. With this fee, Bhutan ensures tourism to the country is sustainable: A high priority is given to conservation of the country’s natural and cultural heritage and new development of tourism is cautious. Tourism enterprises are locally owned and offer a variety of adventure and wildlife tours. Tourism is the largest revenue generating industry in the country, despite the low volume of tourists.

Tourism in Bhutan is an exclusive and unique experience. The country is a good candidate to become a complete ecotourism destination. More than 72% of its land are still covered by forests with a great variety of rare plant and wildlife species. 43% of the country’s surface have been declared protected areas and are open for tourism. The country’s terrain ranges from sub-tropical to alpine at over 7,300 metres. The different seasons are colourful and reflected in wild flowers and plants. All this makes it a perfect destination for trekking holidays: Bhutan boasts some of the world’s most spectacular and pristine environments, dotted with traditional villages, palaces and monasteries that all hold colourful festivals throughout the year. Find rare and endangered animals in the dense forests of Bhutan and discover an untouched paradise.

If you are thinking about going to Bhutan: The best time to go is now! From 2012 the daily fee tourists have to pay will be increased by 50$. For more information about Bhutan and some example itineraries, visit our website.

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